resilience thinking walker and salt pdf

Resilience Thinking Walker And Salt Pdf

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It's short but will repay some extra quiet time Their goal is to get us to look at the world and its systems in a fresh new way. Full of wisdom, sophisticated science, and practical guidance, this book provides profound ideas, insights, and hope to scientists, students, managers, and planners alike.

Resilience

Increasingly, cracks are appearing in the capacity of communities, ecosystems, and landscapes to provide the goods and services that sustain our planet's well-being. The response from most quarters has been for "more of the same" that created the situation in the first place: more control, more intensification, and greater efficiency.

It embraces human and natural systems as complex entities continually adapting through cycles of change, and seeks to understand the qualities of a system that must be maintained or enhanced in order to achieve sustainability.

It explains why greater efficiency by itself cannot solve resource problems and offers a constructive alternative that opens up options rather than closing them down. In Resilience Thinking , scientist Brian Walker and science writer David Salt present an accessible introduction to the emerging paradigm of resilience.

The book arose out of appeals from colleagues in science and industry for a plainly written account of what resilience is all about and how a resilience approach differs from current practices.

Rather than complicated theory, the book offers a conceptual overview along with five case studies of resilience thinking in the real world. It is an engaging and important work for anyone interested in managing risk in a complex world.

It's short but will repay some extra quiet time Their goal is to get us to look at the world and its systems in a fresh new way.

This book should stimulate extensive discussions on these critical issues and innovative ways to approach them. Full of wisdom, sophisticated science, and practical guidance, this book provides profound ideas, insights, and hope to scientists, students, managers, and planners alike. With five clear and compelling case studies drawn from regions as diverse as Florida, Sweden, and Australia, this book shows how all highly adaptive systems—from ecologies to economies—go through regular cycles of growth, reorganization, and renewal and how our failures to understand the basic principles of resilience have often led to disaster.

Resilience Thinking gives us the conceptual tools to help us cope with the bewildering surprises and challenges of our new century.

A few weeks ago the world learnt of the disappearance of the Bramble Cay melomys, a small Australian rodent only known to occur on a tiny coral cay off the northern tip of Australia. The finding is noted in a government report that documents how a comprehensive search for the species in had failed to detect a single animal. Indeed, so close to sea level is the tiny island that it probably provided little refuge to the melomys from big weather events. The authors even suggested ocean inundation could have directly killed or carried away individual animals!

Thousands of species around the world are on the lip of extinction but the loss of the Bramble Cay melomys is particularly poignant in that human-induced climate change has been identified as the root cause of its demise. Sea-level rise and increased frequency and intensity of weather events have been noted as the cause of the loss of its island home.

The loss of a species of island rat does not overly concern everyone, something that is clear if you peruse the discussion threads following some of the articles on this event for example, see Nature and The Washington Post and many simply deny the existence of climate change read those same discussion threads.

And yet the loss of the Bramble Cay melomys should be ringing alarm bells everywhere. The Bramble Cay melomys has crossed an irreversible threshold. And with its passing, the system it was a part of has lost a natural component making it less able to cope with change and disturbance; such is the consequence of biodiversity loss.

It is parts per million of carbon dioxide. This year we crossed ppm. This increase in disturbance threatens to overwhelm the resilience of many species, especially those living in low areas, and the loss of the Bramble Cay melomys is but the start of this process.

Biodiversity loss makes us more vulnerable to climate change, less able to absorb the disruption it brings. Resilience thinking helps us engage with the complexity of the world, guiding our management of ecosystems. Part of that complexity is the strength of policy feedbacks to change. Some have suggested we should have moved the last Bramble Cay melomys to some safe harbor before they were swallowed by the hungry sea. They need to be tighter. And maybe we should seeing this rodent as a canary in the coalmine.

We asked a few authors to choose their favorite Island Press book—other than their own, of course—and explain what makes it so special. As a writer, this book and its amazing details helped me bring the jaguar to life for readers. This day is a time for reaching beyond data and logic to think about deeper ways of knowing.

Love, specifically, but I would add to that faith, tradition and ethics. Aaron Wolf provides the experience, tools and promise of a better, deeper approach. Like many others, I am indebted to to Island Press for not one but three books that profoundly influenced my thinking. Panarchy , edited by Lance Gunderson and C. Holling introduced me to the concept of socio-ecological systems resilience.

Resilience Thinking , by Brian Walker and David Salt taught me what systems resilience really means. And the follow-up book Resilience Practice helped me start to understand how systems resilience actually works.

The latter remains the most-consulted book on my shelf—by Island Press or any other publisher—and I was thrilled and frankly humbled when Brian and David agreed to write a chapter for our own contribution to the field, The Community Resilience Reader Finally, a near complete set of highly usable and mutually supportive design standards that help us advocate for and build better streets, better places.

Lake Effect by Nancy Nichols. I read this book several years ago. It is so important to hear the voices of those whose lives are impacted by industrial age pollutants, lest we slide into complacency. In this case, the story of the chemicals of Lake Michigan. It is a short, beautifully written, disturbing read. Each edition brings in-depth coverage of the issues of the day, always eminently readable and backed up by the crack research team that he puts together for each topic.

Mark Jerome Walters ' important book, Seven Modern Plagues , places great emphasis on linking emerging diseases with habitat destruction and other forms of modification natural processes.

This book is a call for us to recognize that each new disease reflects an environmental warning. Perhaps it remains my favorite IP text because it is the first IP text I remember reading front to back, twice!

I first encountered the book as a graduate student and was struck my its scope and tone. The book is thought provoking. And such is the case with the release of beaver families back in the wild in the UK. In this manner these furry creatures act as ecosystem engineers providing a valued ecosystem service.

In doing so, their activity increases the resilience of the social-ecological systems in which they operate, enabling it to better absorb disturbances in the form of floods. Bettongs are natural-born diggers, busily burrowing into the earth in pursuit of food. They can dig over holes in a single night, moving some 3 tonnes of soil each year. In the process they improve water infiltration, distribute nutrients and inoculate gum trees with fungi the trees depend upon to grow.

They make a significant contribution to the health and resilience of box gum grassy woodlands they inhabit. Those woodlands have long been in steep decline and are now listed as a critically endangered ecosystem. Beavers and bettongs are keystone species. Removing or re-introducing them has ramifying effects in the ecosystem, significantly changing both structure and function, akin to the cascading effects of removing top predators.

Landscapes are complex adaptive systems, and when these ecosystem engineers dropped out being hunted or preyed upon until they disappeared , the system left behind reorganizes around their absence. A century later four in the case of the beaver and the system is now quite different to the one they formerly occupied. It usually comes back via a different path and the system may not be the exact same system.

Beavers and the dams they produce are unlikely to produce the same landscape as the landscape of four centuries ago. And bettongs are unlikely to restore the full function of woodlands from a hundred years ago.

Both the beaver and the bettong are being reintroduced in fenced off areas so they can be protected and contained, and beyond the fence lies a hostile world. In the case of the bettongs, the threat that removed them from the landscape — the fox — is still present. Until these exotic predators are somehow managed, a bettong-led recovery is highly unlikely.

Yes, we hope for the re-establishment of these ecosystem engineers across the broader landscape. But our optimism about these developments needs to be tempered by the realities of working with complex systems. Sales of international rights fulfill a worldwide need for resources about solutions to environmental issues like climate change, wildlife extinction, and pollution.

Through this work, our books have been published in at least 25 languages, including Arabic, French, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish. Some countries are more likely to publish books about certain topics. For example, many of our urban design titles have made it into Chinese bookshelves given urbanization trends and a growing interest in sustainability. I feel honored to work with many committed international publishers to share these ideas in many languages.

Below is a sampling of recent or notable Island Press books in translation. Sustaining Ecosystems and People in a Changing World. Pub Date:. August Add to Cart. E-book Format. June Exam Copy. Book Description. Review Quotes. Bramble Cay melomys were only known to occur on a tiny coral cay off the northern tip of Australia. Map via Wikimedia Commons. Share your answer in the comments.

Share it in the comments below! Valentine's Day. Katharine Sucher. A bettong is released near Canberra, Australia. Image by Lannon Harley.

Resilience Thinking: Sustaining Ecosystems and People in a Changing World

In , Resilience Thinking addressed an essential question: As the natural systems that sustain us are subjected to shock after shock, how much can they take and still deliver the services we need from them? This idea caught the attention of both the scientific community and the general public. In Resilience Practice , authors Brian Walker and David Salt take the notion of resilience one step further, applying resilience thinking to real-world situations and exploring how systems can be managed to promote and sustain resilience. The book begins with an overview and introduction to resilience thinking and then takes the reader through the process of describing systems, assessing their resilience, and intervening as appropriate. Following each chapter is a case study of a different type of social-ecological system and how resilience makes a difference to that system in practice. The final chapters explore resilience in other arenas, including on a global scale. It offers an easy-to-read but scientifically robust guide through the real-world application of the concept of resilience and is a must read for anyone concerned with the management of systems at any scale.


In "Resilience Thinking", scientist Brian Walker and science writer David Salt present an accessible introduction to the emerging paradigm of resilience.


Resilience Thinking

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Resilience Thinking: Sustaining Ecosystems and People in a Changing World

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Increasingly, cracks are appearing in the capacity of communities, ecosystems, and landscapes to provide the goods and services that sustain our planet's well-being. The response from most quarters has been for "more of the same" that created the situation in the first place: more control, more intensification, and greater efficiency. It embraces human and natural systems as complex entities continually adapting through cycles of change, and seeks to understand the qualities of a system that must be maintained or enhanced in order to achieve sustainability. It explains why greater efficiency by itself cannot solve resource problems and offers a constructive alternative that opens up options rather than closing them down.


Resilience Thinking: Sustaining Ecosystems and People in a Changing World. Brian Walker and David Salt. Island Press (). “Whenever we pick out any-.


Resilience Thinking: Sustaining Ecosystems and People in a Changing World

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Within this context resilience is viewed as one of three integrated capacities:. Resilience — the capacity of a system to recover from stress and disturbance while retaining its essential functions, structure, feedbacks and identity; 2. Transformability — the capacity of actors to create a fundamentally new system when ecological, economic, or social structures make the existing system untenable. Resilience, adaptability and transformability all require capacity for social learning about systemic change in response to management intervention, external shocks and change within subsystems at lower and higher levels 2. This vision binds together diverse IUCN work areas such as species conservation, ecosystem restoration, governance including equity and rights, climate change adaptation, food and water security, and disaster risk reduction. Vision IUCN uses resilience of social-ecological systems as a foundational concept to design and implement conservation efforts that are effective and durable in the face of complex and uncertain interactions between people and nature.

Environmental and emergency leaders are important individuals who play a vital role in managing ecological resources. Based on the resilience thinking of Walker and Salt, this study highlights aims to how resilience for adaptive management can be built by incorporating vision formation of environmental and emergency management leaders. The study addresses two research questions: What constitutes environmental and emergency leadership systems? How are the concepts of vulnerability, resilience, and adaptation relevant to the environmental and emergency management processes? The study employs two case studies and discusses how resilience leadership can be incorporated into environmental management and emergency management systems in organizations.

It embraces human and natural systems as complex entities continually adapting through cycles of change, and seeks to understand the qualities of a system that must be maintained or enhanced in order to achieve sustainability. It explains why greater efficiency by itself cannot solve resource problems and offers a constructive alternative that opens up options rather than closing them down. In Resilience Thinking, scientist Brian Walker and science writer David Salt present an accessible introduction to the emerging paradigm of resilience. The book arose out of appeals from colleagues in science and industry for a plainly written account of what resilience is all about and how a resilience approach differs from current practices. Rather than complicated theory, the book offers a conceptual overview along with five case studies of resilience thinking in the real world. It is an engaging and important work for anyone interested in managing risk in a complex world. Log In.

Resilience Thinking by Walter Reid; Brian Walker; David Salt

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Resilience thinking: integrating resilience, adaptability and transformability Published on Nov 15, in Ecology and Society 3. Carol Folke Estimated H-index: View Paper. Add to Collection. Resilience thinking addresses the dynamics and development of complex social-ecological systems SES.

Resilience thinking: integrating resilience, adaptability and transformability Published on Nov 15, in Ecology and Society 3. Carl Folke Estimated H-index: View Paper.

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3 Comments

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    Resilience Thinking. Sustaining Ecosystems and People in a Changing World. NE. BE. LED. Brian Walker & David Salt. Foreword by Walter V. Reid.

    06.05.2021 at 21:42 Reply
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